Rushton Cot

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1-6 High Street 

 

 

Rushton Cottage

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Rushton Cottage is the house on the left by the telegraph pole - opposite The Boot Inn

UPPERMOST HOUSE EXCEPT ONE.

RUSHTON COTTAGE.  

Rushton Cottage is now the uppermost house excepting those which were built in the 20th century. There was a cottage beyond it, in 1729 it was owned by the Biggs family of Asserton, but by 1812 it was only an Orchard, and the house was “down”.

Rushton Cottage was one of the few properties owned by Lord Chedworth . He, and his Grobham ancestors (from Great Wishford) had bought 294 acres, a house and four cottages from the Bonham family in 1598, who had it from the Daubney family in 1302. All of this was sold to James Harris Lord Malmesbury in 1807, uniting it with the rest of the village.

Edward Haynes leased this house from 8th May  35th year of Charles II [1683].

Edward Haynes (his son) married Mary Coley on 28th August 1722, and on 30th September of the same year their daughter Elizabeth was baptized.

In 1729 Edward Haynes (the son) surrendered the lease for £10 and arranged a new lease between Sir Richard Howe and himself on the lives of himself and his daughter Elizabeth now aged 7. It “contains about 5 luggs in Berwick St James the uppermost house in the street of Berwick St James aforesaid except one….  with liberty for keeping one cow on the downes.” This is administered by the Steward of Lord Chedworth at the Manor of Stapleford, rather than the steward of Berwick St James.

In 1772 George Gilbert became the tenant. Then James Carter cordwainer [bootmaker] leased in 1781 “all that Little Dwelling House with garden plot.” He lived here and  it was still called “Carters” in 1812 even though James Carter had died in 1806.

By 1796 it was leased to Robert Hayden, he still leased it in 1843, but he didn’t live here.

Lord Chedworth’s land was bought by Lord Malmesbury.

This house is now the uppermost house excepting those which were built in the 20th century. There was a cottage beyond it, in 1729 it was owned by the Biggs family of Asserton, but by 1812 it was only an Orchard, and the house was “down”.

In the early 1840’s Thomas Harman, a harness maker, and his family and a lodger lived here. They lived here for another 30 years at least, until they moved to one of the cottages further down. Thomas died in 1885 aged 71, and Elizabeth his wife in 1891 aged 79.

In the late 1870’s this house began to be used by the farm workers. The first was Philip Blanchard aged 46 a pensioner from Royal Marines who had been born in Berwick, his wife Susan and children, 5 of who had been born at Gosport. He died in 1914 aged 80, having been a farm worker the rest of his life. But the family moved to Godwins Cottage before 1891 and were there in 1901.

Then George Blanchard and his family lived here, it was a good sized house - 9 rooms, needed for George and Jane and their six children, the oldest William was aged 28 in 1901.

 It was sold with the rest of the village in 1921. Being “a detached cottage, containing 3 bedrooms, Kitchen, scullery, coal House and pantry.” The Blanchards continued to live here, but by the 1930s Mrs Muriel Ashford and her son Derek, were living here.

Researched and written by Nicky Street.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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